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  • Jordan Fears-Neal

What's your plan for 2020?


As we start the new year, we often hear things like, "This year I'm going to be better at..." or "By the end of this year I'd like to accomplish..." But the reality is unless we change something and create a plan to get where we want to go, we'll often end up in the same place we started, with another year passing through our hands. This is true for everyone, whether it's an individual, a business, an organization - plans provide pathways.


If we've had the pleasure to talk about your organization and its plan, you've probably heard me speak about logic models and how they play into your fundraising goals. There are two questions I always ask my clients, "Does this serve the mission?" and "How do we measure our impact of that mission?" When we look at our mission, everything we do should flow into making that mission a reality.


I've often said that organizations shouldn't be "proud" of the fact that they've been around for decades. Why? Because a nonprofit's job is to eradicate a need within a community. If we're eliminating a need, shouldn't our programs solve something instead of enabling the cycle to continue? The only way to achieve the eradication of a need is to plan a course of action that has tangible results. Otherwise, we'll run in circles for the next 50 years.


Lots of times, we pile on new ideas and take on additional challenges because we believe it will add value. However, when we take a step back and look at our mission, we see that instead of adding it's taking away and diverting us from our intended purpose. Have you ever seen an organization advertise a new program and think, "But that's not your mission"? Good intentions don't always get us the intended result. Organizations that continually add programs and change up their mission signals that they haven't quite solidified what they want to accomplish.


Not only do plans help an organization internally, but a thorough logic model with identified objectives, outcomes, and goals also can mean additional funding. If you're looking to up your grant program this year, it's important to note that many foundations require organizations to have a logic model in hand.


So, my question to you is, what do you want to accomplish this year? How are you going to sharpen your focus and create a 20/20 vision for yourself and your organization?


Take some time to ask yourself these questions and see if they all point back to your mission:

Are the programs we've identified being measured? Are the outcomes that we've identified, ultimately leading towards our overall mission?


  • Have we spread ourselves too thin?

  • Why are we adding this new program?

  • What is our plan in two years, five years, ten years?

  • If we meet our ultimate goal, will our programs still be needed in 10+ years?

  • If these questions are overwhelming or you don't know where to start, our team is here to help you.


Let us make 2020 the best year yet!




The best is yet to come!

Jordan Fears-Neal

President and Founder